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Table 4 Patients taking painkillers and being on sick leave at baseline and follow upa

From: Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D™): evidence-based education and supervised neuromuscular exercise delivered by certified physiotherapists nationwide

Baseline to 3 months
Outcome Joint Baseline status Yes at 3 months No at 3 months
Painkillers due to knee/hip? Knee (n = 4,023) Yes at baseline (n = 2,250) 1,162 1,088
No at baseline (n = 1,773) 315 1,458
Risk of taking painkillers at baseline (95% CI) 55.9% (54.4–57.5)
Risk of taking painkillers at 3 months (95% CI) 36.7% (35.2–28.2)
Hip (n = 1,385) Yes at baseline (n = 804) 472 332
No at baseline (n = 581) 147 434
Risk of taking painkillers at baseline (95% CI) 58.1% (55.5–60.7)
Risk of taking painkillers at 3 months (95% CI) 44.7% (42.1–47.3)
Baseline to 12 months
Outcome Joint Baseline status Yes at 12 months No at 12 months
Sick leave due to knee/hip?* Knee and hip (n = 711) Yes at baseline (n = 173) 53 120
No at baseline (n = 538) 53 485
Risk of being at sick leave at baseline (95% CI) 24.3% (21.2–27.5)
Risk of being at sick leave at 12 months (95% CI) 14.9% (12.3–17.5)
  1. a Painkillers were defined as acetaminophen, NSAIDs or opioids/opioid-like painkillers; only patients associated with the labour market (excluding old-age pensioners and people on early retirement pension or disability pension) were included in the analysis of sick leave. The risk of taking pain killers at 3 months and the risk of being on sick leave at 12 months were significantly lower than the corresponding risks at baseline (P < 0.0001) for patients with knee and hip OA, respectively