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Table 1 Legacy instruments

From: Graded response model fit, measurement invariance and (comparative) precision of the Dutch-Flemish PROMIS® Upper Extremity V2.0 item bank in patients with upper extremity disorders

DASH30 items (addressed to disabilities and symptoms in musculoskeletal disorders of the upper limbs).
Timeframe: during the last week.
Six different 5-point Likert response scales:
 • No difficulty/Mild difficulty/Moderate difficulty/Severe difficulty/Unable
 • Not at all/Slightly/Moderately/Quite a bit/Extremely
 • Not limited at all/Slightly limited/Moderately limited/Very limited/Unable
 • None/Mild/Moderate/Severe/Extreme
 • No difficulty/Mild difficulty/Moderate difficulty/Severe difficulty/So much difficulty that I can’t sleep
 • Strongly disagree/Disagree/Neither agree or disagree/Agree/Strongly agree.
Higher scores imply more disability: 0 (no disability) to 100 (most severe disability).
QuickDASH11 items (addressed to disabilities and symptoms in musculoskeletal disorders of the upper limbs).
Timeframe: during the last week.
Two different 11-point response scales:
 • Pain: 0 (no pain) to 10 (unbearable pain)
 • Function: 0 (no disability) to 10 (most disability)
Higher scores imply more disability: 0 (no disability) to 100 (most severe disability).
MHQ-ADL7 items (addressed to activities of daily living). Timeframe: during the last week.
One 5-point Likert response scale:
 • Not difficult at all/A little difficult/Somewhat difficult/Moderately difficult/Very difficult.
Higher scores imply less disability: 0 (Very difficult to do) to 100 (not difficult to do at all).
  1. Abbreviations in alphabetic order: DASH Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand, MHQ-ADL Michigan Hand Questionnaire-Activities of Daily Living subscale