Skip to main content

Table 7 Ranking of patient history examination clinical indicators that achieved consensus

From: Clinical indicators to identify neuropathic pain in low back related leg pain: a modified Delphi study

1) Pain in association with other neurological symptoms (e.g. pins and needles, numbness, weakness) increases your index of suspicion that there is a NP component to low back related leg pain
2) Pain variously described as burning, electric shock like and/or shooting into leg increases your index of suspicion of a NP component to low back related leg pain.
3) History of nerve injury, pathology or mechanical compromise at the region of the nerve root/or other nervous tissue around the lumbar spine that can refer into the leg increases your index of suspicion of a NP component to low back related leg pain.
4) Pain described as crawling or another unpleasant abnormal sensation (as a common example of dysesthesia) increases your index of suspicion of a NP component to low back related leg pain.
5) Reports of spontaneous pain (i.e. stimulus independent) and/or paroxysmal pain (i.e. sudden recurrences and intensification of pain) increases your index of suspicion that there is a NP component to low back related leg pain
  1. Ranking of importance: 1 = highest important, 5 = least important