Skip to main content

Advertisement

Table 1 A priori hypotheses to assess DASH responsiveness in patients with subacromial pain syndrome (n = 50)

From: Responsiveness and minimal important change of the Norwegian version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH) in patients with subacromial pain syndrome

No. Hypotheses and rationales for the hypotheses  
1 The correlation between change scores of DASH and NPRS is moderate (r = 0.50–0.69). Disability and pain are different, but related constructs as shown in previous studies [54, 55]. Yes
2 The correlation between change scores of DASH and SPADI is high (r = 0.70–0.89). Both questionnaires assess disability in similar shoulder pain conditions, and high correlation coefficients have been shown in previous studies [13, 56]. Yes
3 The correlation between change scores of DASH and the subdomain SPADI function is higher than between change scores of DASH and the subdomain SPADI pain. This hypothesis is based on previous studies showing that DASH has a lower emphasis on pain than on function and disability [13, 57]. Yes
4 The correlation between change scores of DASH and the SF-36 subdomain Physical functioning (PF) is higher than between change scores of DASH and the SF-36 subdomain Bodily pain (BP). This hypothesis has the same rationale as hypothesis no. 3. Yes
5 The correlation between change scores of DASH and AROM abduction is moderately and negatively correlated (r = − .50–0.69). This hypothesis is based on findings in previous studies [46, 58]. Yes
6 The correlation between change scores of DASH and AROM of abduction is higher than the correlation between change scores of DASH and other AROM movements. Abduction is a typical impairment in sub-acromial pain syndrome [59]. Yes
Number of accepted hypotheses (%) 6 (100)
  1. DASH disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire, NPRS numeric pain rating scale, SPADI shoulder pain and disability index, SF-36 The Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), AROM active range of motion