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Table 1 PT background data, attitudes towards a behavioral medicine working model and self-efficacy for managing patients with and without yellow flags (n =12)

From: Physical therapists’ assessments, analyses and use of behavior change techniques in initial consultations on musculoskeletal pain: direct observations in primary health care

Background variable  
Sex, female n 12
Age, mean (range) 50 (39-57)
Years in the profession, mean (range) 19 (10-35)
Years in primary healthcare, mean (range) 14 (3-28)
Further education  
 Behavioral medicine or cognitive behavioral therapy, n 6
 Motivational interviewing, n 5
 Pain treatment/rehabilitation, acupuncture, n 7
 Orthopedic manual therapy, n 8
 Other coursesa, n 12
Attitudes towards a behavioral medicine working model for clinical reasoning Md (IQR)  
 1. How important is it for you to work according to a behavioral medicine model for clinical reasoning? (NRS 0-10)b 8.5 (2.5)
 2. How confident are you to work according to a behavioral medicine model of clinical reasoning? (NRS 0-10)b 6.0 (2.7)
 3. How ready are you to work according to a behavioral medicine model of clinical reasoning? (NRS 0-10)b 7.0 (4.5)
Self-efficacy Md (IQR)  
Managing patients with fear of movement and/ or catastrophizingc (0-90) 60.0 (45.0)
Managing patients without fear of movement and/ or catastrophizingd (0-70) 45.0 (28.0)
  1. aMcKenzie method of mechanical diagnosis and therapy (MDT), medical exercise therapy, specific manual treatment of the joints, body awareness treatment, sports medicine, educational courses and physical activity and exercise. b rating scale 0-10, where 0 = not important at all/ low confidence/ not ready at all, and 10 = extremely important/ high confidence/ completely ready c 9 items, rating scale 0-10, where 0 = low self-efficacy and 10 = high self-efficacy
  2. d 7 items, rating scale 0-10, where 0 = low self-efficacy and 10 = high self-efficacy