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Table 2 Comparative effects of vibratory (N = 14) and walking-based exercise (N = 14) programs in postmenopausal women.

From: Low-frequency vibratory exercise reduces the risk of bone fracture more than walking: a randomized controlled trial

   Baseline Change to 8 months Treatment effect P†
   Mean (SD) Mean (95%CI) Mean (95%CI)  
BMD (gr·m-2)      
Lumbar spine Vibratory 0.95 (0.12) -0.01 (-0.04 to 0.02) 0.00 (-0.03 to 0.03) .983
  Walking 0.83 (0.13) -0.01 (-0.02 to 0.01)   
Femoral neck Vibratory 0.79 (0.10) 0.02 (-0.01 to 0.04) 0.03 (0.01 to 0.06) .011
  Walking 0.78 (0.13) -0.02 (-0.03 to 0.00)   
Trochanter Vibratory 0.68 (0.08) 0.01 (-0.01 to 0.02) 0.02 (-0.01 to 0.04) .084
  Walking 0.60 (0.10) -0.01 (-0.02 to 0.02)   
Ward's triangle Vibratory 0.63 (0.11) 0.04 (-0.01 to 0.09) 0.03 (-0.02 to 0.09) .070
  Walking 0.58 (0.12) 0.01 (-0.02 to 0.02)   
Balance (trials) Vibratory 9.4 (5.1) -2.7 (-5.7 to -0.1) -3.2 (-6.3 to -0.2) .023
  Walking 11.3 (3.9) 0.5 (-0.9 to 0.6)   
BMI (kg/m2) Vibratory 28.8 (4.3) -0.90 (-1.8 to -0.1) -0.8 (-1.7 to 0.0) .049
  Walking 27.3 (2.9) -0.1 (-0.3 to 0.2)   
  1. BMD = Bone mineral density; BMI = Body mass index.
  2. * Values expressed as mean (SD) with the 95% confidence intervals.
  3. † P values of ANOVA for repeated measures, adjusted by baseline data and age to compare differences between groups at 8 months