Open Access

Erratum to: multidimensional associative factors for improvement in pain, function, and working capacity after rehabilitation of whiplash associated disorder: a prognostic, prospective outcome study

  • Felix Angst1Email author,
  • Andreas R Gantenbein1,
  • Susanne Lehmann1,
  • Françoise Gysi-Klaus1,
  • André Aeschlimann1,
  • Beat A Michel2 and
  • Frank Hegemann1
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders201415:195

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2474-15-195

Received: 4 June 2014

Accepted: 4 June 2014

Published: 20 June 2014

The original article was published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 2014 15:130

Correction

After publication of this work [1], we became aware of some typing errors, missing data and ambiguities in the results and discussion.
  1. 1)

    In the results, second paragraph, second last sentence, it has to be clarified: High functional improvement (NASS) was associated with high reduction of CSQ catastrophizing (19.4% explained variance), low baseline NASS function (11.4%), NASS pain relief (11.3%), and low baseline NASS pain (5.9%).

     
  2. 2)

    In the results, third paragraph, the results of the 6 month follow-up rely on Table two.

     
  3. 3)

    In the same paragraph later on, the following is more precise: The most important associative factor for high pain relief (NASS) was a low NASS baseline pain level (reflecting high pain) (35.5%), high improvement in NASS function (14.8% explained variance), and a low baseline score on NASS function (13.8%). And later on:

     
High functional improvement (SF-36) was associated with high reduction of HADS depression (20.5% explained variance), low baseline SF-36 function (19.3%) and high baseline depression on the HADS (12.2%), as well as pain relief on the SF-36 (6.6%).
  1. 4)

    In Table three (Table 1 here), missing data of the category sports have been added, see below.

     
Table 1

Sociodemographic and disease-relevant data at baseline (n = 175)

Female

79.4%

Living with partner / spouse

72.0%

Education

 

   Basic school (8–9 years)

7.6%

   Vocational training

14.0%

   College

52.3%

   High school / university

26.1%

Smoker

36.3%

Sports

 

   None

33.7%

   <1 hour/week

24.4%

   1–2 hours/week

18.6%

   >2 hours/week

23.3%

Analgesic medication on admission

61.1%

Antidepressive medication on admission

25.7%

Comorbitities (n)

 

   None

16.0%

   1

34.9%

   2

29.7%

   3

13.7%

   4 or more

5.7%

Car accident

78.9%

Working capacity (hours/week)

 

   0-5

43.4%

   6-10

5.7%

   11-15

10.8%

   16-20

9.7%

   21-25

10.8%

   26-30

6.8%

   31-35

5.2%

   36-40

3.5%

   41-45

3.5%

   46-50

0.6%

Age (years): mean (SD)

37.4 (11.7)

Disease duration (months): mean (SD)

13.3 (10.7)

Body mass index: mean (SD)

24.3 (4.7)

Legend: SD: Standard deviation.

  1. 5)

    In the discussion, third paragraph, the following has to be clarified: Our data suggest that patients suffering from severe pain and/or severe disability were more likely to improve and to profit from rehabilitation, because low baseline levels of the pain scores (reflecting much pain) and of the function scores (reflection much disability) were most associated with improvements in these dimensions.

     

These corrections substantially improve comprehensibility and distinctness of the data and the interpretations. However, the corrections do not alter the results and the conclusions of the study.

Notes

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Rehabilitation Clinic "RehaClinic"
(2)
Department of Rheumatology, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University Hospital of Zurich

References

  1. Angst F, Gantenbein AR, Lehmann S, Gysi-Klaus F, Aeschlimann A, Michel BA, Hegemann F: Multidimensional associative factors for improvement in pain, function, and working capacity after rehabilitation of whiplash associated disorder. BMC Musculoskelet Dis. 2014, 15 (1): 130-10.1186/1471-2474-15-130.View ArticleGoogle Scholar
  2. Pre-publication history

    1. The pre-publication history for this paper can be accessed here:http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2474/15/195/prepub

Copyright

© Angst et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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